Variegated Slanted Shell Cap

I’m really pleased how this cap turned out, I hope it fits the intended recipient and that she likes it enough to wear it!

For this cap, I used a beautiful variegated yarn from the Wangaratta Mill, which is in Australia. If I had a choice, I would only use locally produced yarn, but of course its amongst the most expensive. Luckily I found this yarn on special! It has flecks of green, purple, pink and blue in it, which is very nice! My guess is this is acrylic, not wool due to the price I got it at, but I might be mistaken as the label did not say.

For this cap I used the 4mm hook and started with 7 rounds of increasing dc. I then tried a new stitch I saw for the first time the other day on youtube called a slanted shell stitch. I had to have a think about how I would do it in a round though. I turned the cap around and went back the other way, starting with 3 sl st before starting the slanted shell pattern. There are 10 rounds of slanted shell in this cap. Finally, I edged it with 5 dc scallops, with a sc in the 3rd dc. This is 24cm along the rim (so 48cm circumference), and its 19cm high.

This cap might be too warm to wear on a hot summer’s day, but hopefully it will make a very pretty autumn cap.

Light and Airy Pretty Pink Cap for a small child

This cap was originally intended for a 9 year old, but its turned out too small for her. This one will fit a 1 to 3 year old, so I will make another one that is larger.

My friend knows a 9 year old girl who is loosing her hair due to chemotherapy. Just imagine being 9 and having to go through that. I’m hoping to make her a nice cap, I chose this yarn because it’s nice and soft with a silky feel. She would need an especially soft yarn, and because its still summer and quite hot, I don’t want to make anything too warm. I’m not sure what the blend is but my guess is that it’s acrylic. I started this on Thursday afternoon and finished it on Friday, using a 4mm hook.

There are 6 increasing rows, then the non-increasing rounds have a pretty lacey pattern. The pattern is 2 ch sk 1, 3 dc, sk 1 (1 dc, sk 1, 3 dc, sk 1) repeated to end, sl st. I thought it would be big enough but I had nearly finished when I realised it would only fit a small child, not a 9 year old, after checking a site that lists head sizes for crochet hats.

But I finished the hat anyway, because I know some 1 year old girls. Maybe one of them would like it?

Monster Beanie for a Small Child

I made this monster beanie yesterday, thinking it was going to be a gift for a 1 year old boy next weekend, but it is sooo hot right now, I really think my beanie will be an inappropriate gift! I will just have to make something else that is more summerish! Inspiration for this beanie came from googling images of ‘crochet gift for one year old boy’ then ‘crochet monster hat’, none were quite like mine.

Using some more of the sea green I have left from the Wangaratte Mill, I started by making a beanie. I fitted it to my 1 year old son’s head, to make sure it would fit, using a 4mm hook. The first 6 rows are increasing, the very first round had 16 dc. The 2nd round increasing every 2nd stitch, so it’s 2 dc 1 dc repeated *, which makes 24 stitches in the round. The 3rd round increases 2 dc 1  dc 1 dc, repeated, the 4th round increases 2 dc 1 dc 1 dc 1 dc, repeated, the 5th round increases 2 dc 1 dc 1 dc 1 dc 1 dc. After that, each row just has the same dc as the previous row. To make a beanie for a larger head, you increase the number of increasing rows, to make a smaller beanie you decrease the number of increasing rows. I make rows until the beanie covered my son’s ears. You can make it slightly shorter, or longer if you want a turned up edge. I hope that makes sense to you, because it makes sense to me!

To make the beanie look like a monster I decorated it with two eyes and 4 sharp white teeth! The pattern for the teeth is 1 ch, 2 dc 1 ch 2 dc, 1 sc, 1 sl st, (1 sc, 2 dc 1 ch 2 dc, 1 sc, 1 sl st) x 3, for 4 teeth. Pull and pinch the ch at the tips slightly to make the teeth appear pointed.  For the eyes, I made 2 flat circles in white. 1st round has 12 dc, the 2nd round has 24 as it increases 2 in every st. Then I made 2 smaller black circles, using finer black wool, I threaded the ends onto a needle to sew the eyes together and onto the beanie at the same time. To finish, I edged the eyes with varigated yarn, also from the Wangaratta Mill, to attach the eyes more securely. I think the multi-coloured edge to the eyes makes the monster more friendly looking, as does the wonky tilt to his eyes!

I’m not sure what will happen to this beanie, I might give it away, or use it as a beanie for my son this coming winter. This was so easy to make, if my friends wanted some I’m sure I could whip up some more. I like making these as the colour choice is pretty open ended, which means I can use up some of this yarn that is piling up here!

* my apologies to my fellow Australians who read UK crochet, as this is in US crochet. To convert into UK crochet sc = dc, dc = tr crochet

Three Small Things – dishcloth, heart, face washer

>>> Here is a face cloth that I edged last night, I simply did one round of double crochet (US sc). This cloth came in a gift pack from the hospital where Tom is staying and it was perfect for a quick edge treatment! I nearly did the edge in blue but decided that would be too boring so did it in a contrasting green instead! The single row looks less frilly I think, so will go well in our growing stash of baby boy goodies. I vowed years ago never to edge face washers with crochet but I succumb to the urge this year while teaching myself crochet. So far I’ve edged a pair of white with purple, and a pair of pink with pink!

<<< I whipped up this variation of Suzetta’s small heart earlier this month. This one has a second round so you can have two colours like I have here. For this one I used my 1.75mm hook. I think this is my favourite heart pattern, thankyou Suzie! I first had a go at this pattern back in January when I was teaching myself how to read crochet patterns, and I’ve come back to this pattern several times so far.

>>> Here is a small ridged green cotton dishcloth that I did up earlier this month using a 4mm hook and the last of the cotton in this colour. I now have two dish cloths this colour, the other green dishcloth I made up last month.  The ridged stitch is at crochetspot.

Colourful Baby Beanies with picot edges

I made the pattern up for these beanies, because I felt like making something cute and quick!

The pattern is based loosely on the Lincraft one I used for the other beanies I’ve made, but this time I left a space after every increase. I prefer to do this now, so I don’t have to count when to increase. Either leaving a space like in these beanies, or a ridge with a post stitch, takes away the need to count every single stitch, this way making them is more fun.

These beanies are shorter than the other beanies I’ve made, as I skipped the last three rows that would have gotten turned up. Then, for a flourish, I added a row of simple picot to make it pretty. And I don’t think these are too pretty for a boy, although I just couldn’t help myself but to make a pink one! I guess I might meet someone with a girl who might like it, or I can donate it to the hospital. All the colours except the pink one are pure Australian merino wool which I bought from Lincraft. The pink wool is some really soft, silky yarn my mum gave me ages ago and we’re not sure what the blend is as it doesn’t have any labels. Each beanie takes about an hour or so to make, and I used 4mm or 4.5mm hooks.

I really should stop making these beanies, in case they don’t fit a real baby, I’ll never really know for sure until I have a baby to fit one on! That’s why I’ve made these in slightly different sizes, hopefully one will get worn!

Three Small Things – coaster, dishcloth, flower

These are three small things I’ve made recently using patterns from Rachel’s Crochetspot. Needless to say, this is one of my favourite crochet websites for free patterns and crochet related discussions.

<<< This drink coaster is proving to be handy, I’m using it by my pc to sit my bottles of water on. This was with a 4mm hook and my thickest cotton, it’s great for soaking up the condensation on my drinks. The pattern for this coaster is at Crochetspot.

>>> I haven’t made a crochet dishcloth before, so I started with this small one to test it out. It’s about the size of a hand’s palm, we’ve started trialling it in the kitchen, and so far so good. I made this basket-weave dishcloth with a 3.5mm hook and some thick aqua coloured cotton my mum gave me for my birthday. The pattern for the basket-weave stitch is at Crochetspot.

<<< I had a go at this small flower from Crochetspot for fun. This was with a small hook and fine cotton and is currently hanging from my pc with the my purple premmie booties.

A big thankyou to Rachel and her team at Crochetspot for these patterns!

Light and Lacy Purple Scarf with Flower Ring

I’m really pleased how delightfully light the lacy trellis stitch on this scarf turned out. Finished with a nice scalloped edge, it has a cute detachable flower scarf ring.

The scarf took me a couple of evenings to complete while watching Battlestar Galactica on our tivo. I used some of the left over winter warmth yarn from Lincraft and an 8mm hook, following the ‘plain trellis’ lace stitch which is basically made up of 5 chains,  on page 94 of Crochet Basics by Jan Eaton. It’s a handy book so I extended my library loan on it for an extra month. The light purple yarn turned out beautifully I think, and I made it nice and long, too. The edges are some scallops I added to make it a bit more ‘pretty’, putting 7 trebles (US dc) in each one, 4 in the corners, each edge has 2 rows of scallops to round it out nicely.

I still felt the scarf needed ‘more’ so I searched for a new flower pattern. I wasn’t happy that the ones I know would ‘match’, so I found this flower on youtube by Teresa. She does heaps of very  well explained crochet tutorials on youtube and has helped me with several things so I do recommend her. This flower turned out real cute, using a 4.5mm hook to make the shape more defined than the loose stitch in the scarf. By making a chain on the back, the scarf can be threaded through and held firmly, so this flower can be used as a scarf ring which can be removed.

I made this purple scarf with my mother-in-law Freya in mind, as I remember she likes purple and I still had this beautiful yarn in my stash.  Although winter is over, it’s still a little chilly, maybe she will get some use out of it before it gets really hot. I hope she likes it!

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